Type Travel – Manchester

This is a journey through time and space by bicycle, around the rugged, ragged streets of East Manchester.

Undertaken on Sunday September 2nd 2018.

This is type travel – the search for words and their meanings in an ever changing world.

 

map

Hyde Road

P1280955

P1280956

The Star Inn – former Wilsons pub

Devonshire Street North

P1280961

Former Ardwick Cemetery

P1280962

Great Universal Stores former mail order giant

Palmerston Street

P1280979

The River Inn abandoned pub

Every Street

P1290001

All Souls Church – listed yet unloved

Pollard Street East

P1290008.jpg

Screen Shot 2018-09-04 at 08.37.57

The Bank Of England abandoned pub

P1290020

Ancoats Works former engineering company

Cambrian Street

P1290024.jpg

The Lunchbox Café Holt Town

Upper Helena Street

P1290028

The last remnants of industrial activity

Bradford Road

P1290046

Brunswick Mill

P1290048

The little that remains of Raffles Mill

P1290052

Old Mill Street

P1290054

Ancoats Dispensary loved listed and still awaiting resuscitation

P1290056.jpg

New life New Islington

Redhill Street

P1290057

Former industrial powerhouse currently contemporary living space

Henry Street

P1290063

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth passed by in 1942

Jersey Street

P1290064

Former School the stone plaque applied to a newer building

Gun Street

P1290065

The last of the few Blossom Motors

Addington Street

P1290067

P1290069

Former fruit merchants – refurbished and home to the SLG creative agency

Marshall Street and Goulden Street area

P1290070

P1290071

P1290073

P1290081

P1290086

P1290087

The last remnants of the rag trade

Sudell Street

P1290089

P1290090

All that’s left of Alexandra Place

P1290092

Entrance to the former Goods Yard

Back St Georges Road

P1290096

Sharp Street

P1290099

P1290100

Simpson Street

P1290101

Where once the CWS loomed large

Charter Street

P1290102

P1290107

Ragged but right

Aspin Lane

P1290109

P1290117

Angel Meadow 

Corporation Street

P1290118

 

Heaton Mersey Vale – Stockport

A mighty river valley was formed in the second Ice Age, as the glaciers receded and rushed seaward.

The mighty River Mersey was formed on the eastern edge of Stockport, at the confluence of the Tame and Goyt/Etherow rivers.

Thousands of years in the making, as the water-powered mills of the adjacent Pennine Hills migrate to the lower reaches of the towns, in search of water, workers and steam, the full force of the Industrial Revolution takes shape in the west.

The mixed farming of the alluvial valley, which opens up onto the Lancashire and Cheshire Plains, meets and greets the incursion of dye and brick works, mills and manufacturing.

31891

Fred Schofield’s farm 1930

1963

View towards Stockport from Heaton Mersey Park

Serviced by a complex and competing rail system based around Heaton Mersey Shed.

edgeley2016-11

Opened in 1889 and served until May 1968 operating steam locomotives to the end -Coded 9F.

Heaton_Mersey rail map

Here we were at the centre of a rail hub spreading out in all directions, to and from the ports, cities and resources of the country and beyond.

Great movements of steel, cotton, coal, people and manufactured goods.

Screen Shot 2018-05-16 at 19.27.37

38106

Fireman Eddy “Ned” Kelly

heaton(nigel_bruce7.1965)mersey_old7

Heaton Mersey railway station was opened on 1 January 1880 by the Midland Railway and lay on the newly opened line which ran from Heaton Mersey East Junction to Chorlton Junction and on to Manchester Central station.

The station was situated at the southern end of Station Road which still exists. The station was later operated by the London Midland and Scottish Railway and was closed by the London Midland Region of British Railways on 3 July 1961.

The area was criss-crossed by railways – its bridges traversing the roads, fields and river, dominating the landscape in a wild flurry of steam and smoke.

2633

32822

32625936_2079214925657568_2140863625928114176_o

HeatonMerseyHLBridge3

Screen Shot 2018-05-16 at 10.04.03

Further photographs from Grip 99

Crossing the Mersey – the link between Gorsey Bank and the Shed

10220

Surviving until 2007

screen-shot-2018-05-16-at-10-17-14.png

B&W photographs Stockport Image Archive

The end of steam – as drivers, fireman and staff were transferred to Newton Heath, was followed by the slow demise of the rail network, freight moved to road and passengers purchasing their first cars and a passport to illusory freedom.

The mighty Mersey is now flanked by newer neighbours, a shiny blue administrative pyramid, business park, car showrooms and nature reserve, the only certainty is change.

Screen Shot 2018-05-16 at 10.19.19

P1220916 copy

P1220917 copy

Great volumes of earth are moved to from a new topography a topography of leisure – the gentle stroll, jog and cycle replaces the clank of fire doors and shovel on coal.

NEW-GWEB

But take a look around you and you will see the remnants of the industrial age, shrouded in fresh hawthorn and enshrined in birch and beech.

P1250163

P1250164

P1250169

P1250178

P1250179

P1250180

P1250182

P1250185

P1250186

P1250187

To walk this landscape is to traverse geological, agrarian, industrial and post-industrial time – they all coexist and coalesce. Have an eye, ear and heart open to their resonance and presence, transcend time and space in the Mersey Valley today, you’re part of the leisured generation.