Clark Brothers – Thomas Street Manchester

Who you gonna call?

0161 834 5880 · 34-36 Thomas Street M4 1ER Manchester – Clark Brothers.

There’s nowhere quite like it – a wonderland of wares from who knows where?

Well mostly from upstairs where they hand print the signs.

P1110728 copy

They have everything that you never ever knew that you really wanted.

At prices you just can’t resist.

The finest selection of candy striped bags.

P1110733 copy

Things which twinkle and shimmer like no other things could ever do.

Transform your home into a 380 degree 365 24/7 winter landscape or tropical retreat.

P1110730 copy

P1110731 copy

P1110732 copy

P1110734 copy

Just to wander the wobbly floorboards, is to enter a palace of variety that fills the senses with pure unadulterated delight.

Step inside love and lose yourself in a garden of artifice, happiness and joy!

P1110719 copy

P1110720 copy

P1110721 copy

P1110722 copy

P1110723 copy

P1110724 copy

P1110725 copy

P1110726 copy

P1110727 copy

P1110729 copy

P1110736 copy

P1110737 copy

P1110738 copy

P1110740 copy

 

 

 

The Beefeater Grill – Halifax

1 George Street, Halifax, West Yorkshire, HX1 1HA

The Beefeater Grill and Griddle is a long established family run grill and coffee house located at George Square Halifax. The place has an old fashioned feel to it and serves typical English cafe food which seems to make it popular amongst its local regulars.

Long may it do so.

Strangers to the town we wandered the streets in search of sustenance.

Bewitched bothered and bewildered – seduced by the tiles and signage, it was love at first sight.

The ability and will to resist the broad brush of regeneration and reinvention is all to rare, the traditional café is constantly under threat – the Beefeater has prevailed.

A stunning tiled exterior, a multi level interior and a menu to match, it’s win, win, win all the way.

We went inside and ate.

 

P1010328

P1010329

P1010331

P1010333

P1010334

P1010335

P1010336

P1010337

P1010338

P1010339

P1010340

P1010341

P1010343

P1010344

P1010345

P1010347

P1010348

Type Travel – Manchester

This is a journey through time and space by bicycle, around the rugged, ragged streets of East Manchester.

Undertaken on Sunday September 2nd 2018.

This is type travel – the search for words and their meanings in an ever changing world.

 

map

Hyde Road

P1280955

P1280956

The Star Inn – former Wilsons pub

Devonshire Street North

P1280961

Former Ardwick Cemetery

P1280962

Great Universal Stores former mail order giant

Palmerston Street

P1280979

The River Inn abandoned pub

Every Street

P1290001

All Souls Church – listed yet unloved

Pollard Street East

P1290008.jpg

Screen Shot 2018-09-04 at 08.37.57

The Bank Of England abandoned pub

P1290020

Ancoats Works former engineering company

Cambrian Street

P1290024.jpg

The Lunchbox Café Holt Town

Upper Helena Street

P1290028

The last remnants of industrial activity

Bradford Road

P1290046

Brunswick Mill

P1290048

The little that remains of Raffles Mill

P1290052

Old Mill Street

P1290054

Ancoats Dispensary loved listed and still awaiting resuscitation

P1290056.jpg

New life New Islington

Redhill Street

P1290057

Former industrial powerhouse currently contemporary living space

Henry Street

P1290063

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth passed by in 1942

Jersey Street

P1290064

Former School the stone plaque applied to a newer building

Gun Street

P1290065

The last of the few Blossom Motors

Addington Street

P1290067

P1290069

Former fruit merchants – refurbished and home to the SLG creative agency

Marshall Street and Goulden Street area

P1290070

P1290071

P1290073

P1290081

P1290086

P1290087

The last remnants of the rag trade

Sudell Street

P1290089

P1290090

All that’s left of Alexandra Place

P1290092

Entrance to the former Goods Yard

Back St Georges Road

P1290096

Sharp Street

P1290099

P1290100

Simpson Street

P1290101

Where once the CWS loomed large

Charter Street

P1290102

P1290107

Ragged but right

Aspin Lane

P1290109

P1290117

Angel Meadow 

Corporation Street

P1290118

 

Linda’s Pantry – Manchester

Turn off London Road and into Ducie Street, it’s just around the corner from Piccadilly Station.

Enter a world of warehouses, homes and industry.

webmedia-1.php

webmedia-4.php

webmedia-1.php

webmedia-3.php

webmedia-2.php

Return some fifty years later and you’ll find a café on the corner.

Screen Shot 2018-07-09 at 19.55.53

Return last Saturday you’ll find that it’s gone.

P1270029

No more of this.

b872c05fb8251eb973cf30b3cee7e421

 

Top class scran at prices to suit all pockets.

EGP_MEN_LindasPantry_201017_007JPG

Linda and her crew have packed up the pans and scrammed.

Read all about it – Manchester Evening News

The face of the city changes, as one by one faces and places disappear, new build and mass tourism making ever new demands on space.

The rag trade is in tatters and the tatters are long gone.

It would seem that there is no place for the traditional café or its customers.

So thank you and goodnight, the last pie, chips and gravy has left the counter.

Shut the door and turn out the lights.

P1270025

P1270027

P1270028

P1270033

P1270034

P1270035

P1270038

P1270039

P1270042

P1270044

P1270048

P1270051

P1270052

 

Strangeways Manchester #2

Way back in the Twentieth Century – Cheetwood Industrial Estate was built.

The future was functionalist flat-roofed, concrete, steel and brick boxes.

Adorned with the flowing scripts and signage of the multi-nationals, nationals and local companies, intent upon rendering corporeal the post-war optimism, attendant full-employment and the buoyant business of business.

Fast forward to the future – the roofs have been pitched up, the windows bricked up or shuttered or both, walls encased in sad cladding.

The semi-permanent signage replaced with terminally temporary vinyl.

Joe Sunlight’s neo-classical pediments have been painted a funny colour.

P1000135 copy

P1000157 copy

P1000217 copy

P1000218 copy

P1000223 copy

P1000229 copy

P1000231 copy

P1000234 copy

P1000235 copy

P1000252 copy

P1000255 copy

P1190103 copy

P1190104 copy

P1190106 copy

P1190111 copy

P1190112 copy

P1190114 copy

P1190117 copy

P1190385 copy

P1190387 copy

P1190388 copy

P1190391 copy

P1190398 copy

 

Strangeways Manchester #1

Strangeways?

– How strange.

The Strangeways family themselves are certainly recorded in antiquity at the site, although the name appears differently over time; Strongways in 1306, Strangewayes in 1349 and Strangwishe in 1473. In the late 1500s in records at Manchester Cathedral the surname is spelt Strangwaies.

My thanks to Thomas McGrath for his – Long Lost Histories: Strangeways Hall, Manchester

Before panopticon prisons entered the public imagination, and incarceration was the order of the day for the disorderly, it was all fields around here – with the odd house or baronial hall.

Screen Shot 2018-02-04 at 15.08.30

Swire’s map of 1824

Strange days, over time the prison is built, the assizes appears and disappears and tight groups of tired houses cluster around the incipient industry. The fiefdom’s of old become tie and tithe to successions of industrial plutocrats.

webmedia.php copy

webmedia.php

Broughton Street 1910Photograph J Jackson

Screen Shot 2018-02-04 at 15.10.54

Kelly’s map of 1920

The area becomes the centre of the city’s rag trade, a large Jewish Community, the largest outside of London, grows up around Strangeways, Cheetwood and Cheetham Hill – houses, mills, wholesale, retail, warehouse, ice palace, beer-house, brewery. The area is home to several of Joe Sunlight’s inter-war industrial developments – his Jewish family were named Schimschlavitch, his father a cotton merchant. The family emigrated to England in 1890 and settled in Manchester.

So much for Joe Soap – the area was also the location for local lads, Karl Marx, and Marks & Spencer.

v0_medium

Derby Street 1901 – 1924

Further developments took place with the building of the Cheetwood Industrial Estate – a postwar group of flat-rooved, blocky brick and concrete utilitarian units.

So let’s take a look at the ever so strange streets of Strangeways, in that period of change during the latter part of the Twentieth Century, when manufacturing, retail, repair and distribution were almost, just about to disappear in a puff of globalisation, economic depression and Thatcherism. Where Jack and Jill the lads and lasses, traded, ducked, dived, wheeler dealed from Cortinas, Transits and low milage, one owner, luxuriously leather-seated and walnut-dashed Jags. A vanishing or vanished world, where however briefly – Manchester went architecturally mod.

webmedia-1.php

webmedia-7.php

webmedia.php

Bent Street

webmedia-4.php

webmedia-6.php

webmedia-7.php

webmedia-9.php

webmedia-13.php

Broughton Street

webmedia-1.php

webmedia.php

Carnarvon Street

webmedia-1.php

webmedia-2.php

webmedia.php

Chatley Street

webmedia-5.php

webmedia-9.php

webmedia-10.php

webmedia-4.php

Cheetwood Street

webmedia-3.php

webmedia-5.php

webmedia-8.php

webmedia-9.php copy

webmedia-11.php

webmedia-12.php

webmedia-18.php

Derby Street

webmedia-1.php

webmedia-2.php

webmedia.php

Julia Street

webmedia-1.php

webmedia-2.php

webmedia-3.php

webmedia-5.php

webmedia-6.php

webmedia-8.php

webmedia.php

Knowsely Street

webmedia.php

webmedia-8.php

webmedia-5.php

webmedia-3.php

Sherbourne Street

webmedia.php

Stocks Street

All archival photographs from the Manchester Local Images Collection