Grey Mare – Longsight

Exeter Close/Warmington Drive Manchester Longsight M12 4AT

Once there was this.

Once there was that.

Then there wasn’t.

That’s just the way of it.

Screenshot 2018-11-12 at 12.57.23.png

A dense web of streets awash with back to backs, jobs for all – in conditions perceived to be unfit for purpose.

Of a total of 201,627 present dwellings in Manchester, some 54,700, or 27.1 per cent., are estimated to be unfit. A comparison of slum clearance action taken by six major local authorities, Manchester, Leeds, Birmingham, Liverpool, Sheffield and Bristol, shows that for the five years ending 30th June, 1965, Manchester was top of the league, both in compulsory purchase orders confirmed and the number of houses demolished or closed.

Manchester’s figures -13,151 houses demolished or closed .

Alfred Morris MP Hansard
webmedia-6.php

Along came a wrecking ball and left the pub bereft

webmedia-3.php

The original Grey Mare on Grey Street

Whenever mass slum clearance was carried out, the pubs tended to remain, often for just a short time  because – the story goes – demolition workers refused to touch them, as they wanted somewhere to drink during and after their shift.

webmedia.php

Then along came the cavalry – the bold boys from Fort Ardwick – Coverdale Crescent Estate

webmedia-1.php

A new dawn – and a new pub.

This vision of municipal modernity was short lived, the estate was demolished in the 1980s and the new Coverdale Estate was constructed on the site in 1994.

Screenshot 2018-11-12 at 13.30.46

Image – Pubs Galore

Built in 1972 the pub outlived the system built blocks that surrounded it.

Screenshot 2018-11-12 at 12.57.53

Another new gold dream, another day.

DSC_0066

Despite the high hopes embodied by the low rise rebuilding of the new estate.

The Grey Mare shuts its doors – forever.

DSC_0039

DSC_0040

 

DSC_0042

DSC_0043

DSC_0044

DSC_0046

DSC_0047

DSC_0048

DSC_0049

DSC_0050

DSC_0051

DSC_0053

DSC_0054

DSC_0056

DSC_0057

DSC_0058

DSC_0059

DSC_0061

DSC_0062

DSC_0063

 

Canyons of Industry – Sheffield

Obviously, stating the obvious in Comic Sans on a shocking pink ground may ease the pain of industrial decline and its attendant social and economic ills.

sheffield-regeneration-project-11-728

Sheffield along with the majority of  British manufacturing towns and cities, has seen the wealth created by over a century of hard labour spirited elsewhere, and the means by which that wealth was created shipped overseas or overwritten by new technologies.

This has not been an accident or unfortunate consequence of global trends, it has been government policy.

It has not been government policy to regenerate these towns and cities.

So Sheffield has taken the initiative to become – The fastest growing British city outside London.

With areas of new and arresting development.

Though that may do little to redress the structural economic divides within the city.

 

deprivationsheffieldsimplif

 

So I walked the avenues and alleyways of the Lower Don Valley, early on an October Sunday morning, mourning the passing of the clang and clamour that once fuelled the city and the nation.

An aroma of engine oil and the sound of metal on metal still permeates the area, and the low autumnal sun warms the long straight streets.

 

P1300863

P1300869

P1300870

P1300873

P1300874

P1300875

P1300876

P1300880

P1300886

P1300889

P1300890

P1300892

P1300895

P1300896

P1300897

P1300899

P1300900

P1300912

P1300927

P1300928

P1300929

P1300951