Type Travel – Manchester

This is a journey through time and space by bicycle, around the rugged, ragged streets of East Manchester.

Undertaken on Sunday September 2nd 2018.

This is type travel – the search for words and their meanings in an ever changing world.

 

map

Hyde Road

P1280955

P1280956

The Star Inn – former Wilsons pub

Devonshire Street North

P1280961

Former Ardwick Cemetery

P1280962

Great Universal Stores former mail order giant

Palmerston Street

P1280979

The River Inn abandoned pub

Every Street

P1290001

All Souls Church – listed yet unloved

Pollard Street East

P1290008.jpg

Screen Shot 2018-09-04 at 08.37.57

The Bank Of England abandoned pub

P1290020

Ancoats Works former engineering company

Cambrian Street

P1290024.jpg

The Lunchbox Café Holt Town

Upper Helena Street

P1290028

The last remnants of industrial activity

Bradford Road

P1290046

Brunswick Mill

P1290048

The little that remains of Raffles Mill

P1290052

Old Mill Street

P1290054

Ancoats Dispensary loved listed and still awaiting resuscitation

P1290056.jpg

New life New Islington

Redhill Street

P1290057

Former industrial powerhouse currently contemporary living space

Henry Street

P1290063

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth passed by in 1942

Jersey Street

P1290064

Former School the stone plaque applied to a newer building

Gun Street

P1290065

The last of the few Blossom Motors

Addington Street

P1290067

P1290069

Former fruit merchants – refurbished and home to the SLG creative agency

Marshall Street and Goulden Street area

P1290070

P1290071

P1290073

P1290081

P1290086

P1290087

The last remnants of the rag trade

Sudell Street

P1290089

P1290090

All that’s left of Alexandra Place

P1290092

Entrance to the former Goods Yard

Back St Georges Road

P1290096

Sharp Street

P1290099

P1290100

Simpson Street

P1290101

Where once the CWS loomed large

Charter Street

P1290102

P1290107

Ragged but right

Aspin Lane

P1290109

P1290117

Angel Meadow 

Corporation Street

P1290118

 

Castle Street – Edgeley #1

 

adswood2-generalarea.jpg

I have shuffled and shopped up and down Castle Street for some forty years or so – things have come and things have gone – and continue to do so. High streets have always been subject to so many external forces, they reshape and reform, in rhythm with the times and tides of history.

Horse drawn carriages and trams are long gone, along with the double-decker bus, people powered people rule in a pedestrianised precinct, charity begins at Barnardo’s, the Co-op has been and gone and returned, just up the way.

Two whole chapels, pubs and cinemas seem to have just disappeared.

So let’s take a short trip through time and space along a short strip of Stockport’s past.

Get your boots on.

Pictures from Stockport Image Archive

1908

28729

1902

24436

1917a

1950

36876

1890

1917

1962.jpg

1958

1958a

1951

1 6 69

07b

69

69a

69b

74

93c

1969

1981

93

1983

07 a

93a

84

34929235_10216853242823182_2882427370675896320_n

07 copy

C_71_article_1073950_image_list_image_list_item_0_image

Screen Shot 2018-06-13 at 19.59.23

07

Bus Station – Stockport

From the early part of the Twentieth Century trams and then buses stopped and started in Mersey Square, affording limited succour, space or shelter for the weary traveller.

22942

View from the Fire Station Tower.

10891

View from the Plaza Steps.

The land where the bus station currently stands was then owned and used by North Western Buses – a rather large and uncultivated plot.

pd hancock 78

Work began in April 1979 on a brand new bus station, the first stage finally opening on March 2nd 1982.

14406

Slowly emerging from the rough ground – a series of glass and steel boxes worthy of that master of minimalism Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, a Neue Nationalgalerie in miniature.

79

1979 copy

81

Photographs from Stockport Image Archive

It has stood and withstood the winds of change and perfidious public transport policy, the privatisation of the service, snatched greedily from local authority control.

Passengers have met and parted, whilst buses of every hue and stripe have departed from these draughty boxes.

Screen Shot 2018-04-09 at 17.13.54

Photograph from Victory Guy

There are now plans for imminent demolition and rebuilding – shaping a transport hub fit for the Twenty First Century – Space Age forms for a brave new world.

A new £42m transport interchange in Stockport town centre has taken a step forward after the local council agreed key measures to back the project.

Screen-Shot-2017-09-19-at-07.02.03

Untitled-1

April 9th 2017 here is my photographic record of the Bus Station, I’ve been, gone and come back again countless times through the years.

P1240953 copy

P1240954 copy

P1240456

P1240429

P1240431

P1240441

P1240445

P1240446

P1240447

P1240457

P1250012

P1250013

P1240459

P1240460

P1240462

P1240470

P1240472

P1240473

P1240474

P1240475

P1240476

P1240478

P1240479

P1240484

P1240485

P1240487

P1240488

P1240490

P1240507

P1240512

P1240514

P1240515

 

 

Sea Front Shelter – Hastings

I have been here before, adoring the full range of Hasting’s sea front shelters.

They form an integral part of the general scheme designed and overseen by The Concrete King Sidney Little.

On my most recent visit the most distant shelter was receiving a wash and brush up, a brand new coat of paint or two, restored to bright red and white shipshape order, this land locked delight looked ready to set sail across the adjacent Channel to who knows where.

Offering a somewhat occluded view of blue skies and faraway shores, the bus stops here and goes on forever and forever.

P1170950

P1170955

P1170956

 

P1170961

P1170963

 

P1170965

P1170966

P1170967

P1170968

P1170969

P1170970

P1170971

P1170972

P1170973

P1170974

P1170976

P1170977

P1170978

P1170979

P1170980

P1170982

London Road aka Piccadilly Station – Manchester

The station was originally built as Store Street Station by the Manchester and Birmingham Railway in 1842, before being renamed London Road Station in 1847.  It was shared by the Sheffield, Ashton-under-Lyne & Manchester Railway and it has been rebuilt and added to a number of times, with two news spans added to the train shed roof in 1881 and island platforms added linking to Manchester Oxford Road in 1882 (replacing two old Manchester, South Junction and Altrincham Railway platforms which were built next to the station).

1997-7409_lms_2969

An imposing classical façade with a substantial cast iron and glass train shed, the approach sloping up to the frontage, as of necessity the line entered the city on a raised trackbed.

Manchesterlondonroad_old_postcard

Initially the approach was lined with railway warehousing, subsequently demolished to make way for the redevelopments of the 1960s.

webmedia-5.php

Detailed plans are made to reshape the station concourse and entrance.

webmedia-2.php

1997-9266

Dreams are turned into reality, as near as makes no difference.

webmedia-6.php

webmedia-8.php

tumblr_npa35mFqXm1rr41pto1_1280

The newly electrified lines opening up the city to a world of high speed intercity travel.

0000-0-a-nmsi-wcml-electric-1

The Krays it seems were deemed to be unwelcome visitors, everyone else came and went, met with equanimity and a bright new modernist vista.

tumblr_mhwtgsHJhN1rr41pto1_1280

The brand new shiny buffet replaces the archaic dining rooms, as Brylcreemed, bow tied and moustachioed waiters are consigned to the scrapheap of history.

1995-7233_livst_hr_76

Likewise the gloomy destination boards – out with the old!

1997-7409_LMS_2972

And in with the new.

webmedia-11.php

piccadilly

We have a fully integrated modern interior to deal with the modern passengers’ every need – including crystal clear signage, seating and bins.

114900

webmedia.php

34483218_10216677058538309_3758328904939470848_n

114899

webmedia-12.php

webmedia-14.php

Stars of screen and stage are guided through with consummate ease, Margot Fonteyn and Rudolf Nureyev (in his brand new baby seal skin coat) arrive in 1968 to dance Swan Lake at the Palace.

128088

Esteemed footballer Eusebio on his travels during the 1966 World Cup.

Eusebio

In 1969 Gateway House arrives, Richard Sieffert & Partners wavy hello and goodbye to  Manchester’s premier railway station.

webmedia-17.php

Piccadilly has now seen several revamps, the concourse an exercise in contemporary cluttered retail/airport chic, a 125mph Pendolino journey away from the carefully considered internal order of yesteryear.

Who knows what the future holds?

HS2 to name but one – sit back let the train take the strain.

bdb45994802efc2dffc5f6d4b13b0f78