Fusciardi’s – Eastbourne

Antonio Fusciardi emigrated in the 1960s in search of a better life. He opened a number of businesses in Ireland. In 1965 he met Anna Morelli at an Italian wedding and romance blossomed. The couple married and set up home in Marine Parade, Eastbourne. They worked very hard in establishing the business and attributed their success to ambition, dedication and the family.

It say so here

30 Marine Parade just set back from the seafront, selling the most delicious ice creams, decorated with the most delightful tiles.

I have seen similar in Hanley

DSC_0086 copy

And Halifax

p1010331

These being produced by Malkin Tiles

But neither of the former are anywhere near as nice as these Eastbourne examples.

So get yourself down there feast your eyes on these beauties.

Treat y’self to an ice cream too!

Fusciardi’s – often licked never beaten!

P1310625

P1310626

p13106271.jpg

P1310628

P1310629

P1310630P1310631

P1310632

p13106331.jpg

P1310634

P1310635

P1310636

P1310637

P1310638

P1310639

 

Harbour Bar – Scarborough

Screen Shot 2018-07-27 at 09.36.54

1-3 Sandside, Scarborough, North Yorkshire, YO11 1PE.

Do you remember the first time?

Sometime around 2011, I fell in love with the Harbour Bar Scarborough.

A family business serving home made ice cream since 1945.

It’s a magical world of mirrors, melamine, signs and ice creams.

DSC_0014

DSC_0016

DSC_0019

DSC_0020

DSC_0022

DSC_0023

DSC_0024

DSC_0025

DSC_0028

Since then I’ve been back for a banana split and take the opportunity to take a few more snaps, I never leave anything less than overwhelmingly happy and full.

P1040521

P1040523

P1040524

P1040522

P1040525

DSC_0356

DSC_0357

DSC_0359

DSC_0360

DSC_0027

DSC_0036

DSC_0028

DSC_0025

DSC_0029

DSC_0031

DSC_0032

DSC_0033

DSC_0035

DSC_0042

DSC_0043

DSC_0044

DSC_0046

DSC_0048

DSC_0049

DSC_0050

DSC_0052

DSC_0053

DSC_0055

DSC_0056

DSC_0057

DSC_0061

P1260970

P1260972

P1260973

P1260974

P1260975

P1260976

P1260977

P1260978

P1260979

P1260980

P1260981

P1260982

P1260983

P1260984

P1260985

P1260986

P1260987

P1260988

P1260989

On The Waterfront – Llandudno

A welwyd eisoes.

I’ve been here before, as have others before me.

The town of Llandudno developed from Stone Age, Bronze Age and Iron Age settlements over many hundreds of years on the slopes of the limestone headland, known to seafarers as the Great Orme and to landsmen as the Creuddyn Peninsula.

Some years later.

In 1848, Owen Williams, an architect and surveyor from Liverpool, presented landowner Lord Mostyn with plans to develop the marshlands behind Llandudno Bay as a holiday resort. These were enthusiastically pursued by Lord Mostyn. The influence of the Mostyn Estate and its agents over the years was paramount in the development of Llandudno, especially after the appointment of George Felton as surveyor and architect in 1857.

4358C48B00000578-0-image-m-113_1503056487584

The edge of the bay is marked by concrete steps and a broad promenade, edging a pebbled beach which arcs from Orme to Orme.

Walk with me now and mark the remarkable shelters, paddling pools and bandstand screens, along with the smattering of people that people the promenade.

P1270521

P1270522

P1270445

P1270447

P1270448

P1270449

P1270450

P1270453

P1270456

P1270458 1

P1270460 1

P1270461

P1270463

P1270465

P1270466

P1270467

P1270469

P1270470

P1270471

P1270473

P1270476

P1270477

P1270481

P1270482

P1270484

P1270485

Humberston Fitties

Betwixt and between the two world wars, the shortage of housing for the homeless, hopeless and dispossessed lead to an acceleration in the building of an informal architecture – the so-called Plotlands.

One such area and precious survivor from the last century is the Humberston Fitties – situated to south of Cleethorpes, preserved in time by the happy homesteaders.

Screen Shot 2018-03-04 at 14.47.01

Though under threat from Local Authority negligence or intervention, three hundred and twenty chalets prevail – against the incursion of planning regulations, building specs and a lack of respect.

_P1090924_edited-1

I feel a real affinity for all Plotlands, having spent many summers in the converted Pagham railway carriage, belonging to my Aunty Alice and Uncle Arthur. They relocated to the south coast seeking cleaner air for Arthur’s ailing, industrialised northern lungs, thus prolonging his life.

tamarisk

Tamarisk – Pagham

So here are the photographs I took on a visit to The Fitties in July 2008, I walked the home made roads, amazed by the vigour and variety of shape, size, personal affectation and practical pragmatism, of this all too human architecture.

This is a particular form of independent minded Modernism – hand-forged from the vernacular.

It is better to have your head in the clouds, and know where you are, than to breathe the clearer atmosphere below them, and think that you are in paradise.

Henry David Thoreau

123 copy

barometer

DSC_0003

DSC_0004

DSC_0005

DSC_0006

DSC_0007

DSC_0009

DSC_0010

DSC_0012

DSC_0013

DSC_0014

DSC_0015

DSC_0016

DSC_0017

DSC_0018

DSC_0019

DSC_0020

DSC_0021

DSC_0022

DSC_0023

DSC_0024

DSC_0025

DSC_0030

DSC_0032

DSC_0033

DSC_0035

DSC_0036

DSC_0037

DSC_0038

DSC_0040

DSC_0041

DSC_0042

DSC_0043

DSC_0044

DSC_0045

DSC_0046

DSC_0047

DSC_0048

DSC_0049

DSC_0051

DSC_0052

DSC_0054

DSC_0055

DSC_0056

DSC_0057

DSC_0058

DSC_0059

DSC_0061

nets copy

nets2 copy

roof copy

sea way copy

verandah

 

Sea Front Shelter – Hastings

I have been here before, adoring the full range of Hasting’s sea front shelters.

They form an integral part of the general scheme designed and overseen by The Concrete King Sidney Little.

On my most recent visit the most distant shelter was receiving a wash and brush up, a brand new coat of paint or two, restored to bright red and white shipshape order, this land locked delight looked ready to set sail across the adjacent Channel to who knows where.

Offering a somewhat occluded view of blue skies and faraway shores, the bus stops here and goes on forever and forever.

P1170950

P1170955

P1170956

 

P1170961

P1170963

 

P1170965

P1170966

P1170967

P1170968

P1170969

P1170970

P1170971

P1170972

P1170973

P1170974

P1170976

P1170977

P1170978

P1170979

P1170980

P1170982

Margate – Tidal Pools

Margate a town of two pools.

The first tucked in by the prom, a moments walk from the station and overlooked by the imposing Arlington House and the shimmer of the Turner Contemporary

– alas no longer the domain of the wild swimmer.

A large delicious expanse of seawater, now sadly designated as a boating pond.

I was drawn magnetically to this elemental artifice, where untamed waters meet a controlled concrete geometry, waves temptingly lapping the walls.

Would that it could be open again to the town’s swimmers.

I am latterly reliably informed, that the pool is well used by local aquarists, despite the Local Authority’s prohibitions and ministrations – bravo!

P1050061 copy

P1050062 copy

P1050063 copy

 

P1050065 copy

P1050066 copy

P1050067 copy

 

P1050072 copy

P1050073 copy

P1050077 copy

 

 

P1050082 copy

P1050083 copy

P1050085 copy

The second at Walpole Bay still open to the swimmer and what’s more it’s listed.

Walpole Bay Tidal Pool, one of two tidal pools designed by Margate’s borough engineer in 1937, constructed in concrete blocks reinforced by reused iron tram rails, is listed at Grade II for the following principal reasons: * Structural engineering interest: an ambitious project because of its scale, the weight of each concrete block, and that work needing to be carried out day and night because of the tides; * Scale and design: impressive in scale and shape, occupying 4 acres and three sides of a rectangle, the sides 450 feet long diminishing towards the seaward end which was 300 feet long; * Social historical interest: provided an improvement to sea bathing at the period of the greatest popularity of the English seaside; * Degree of intactness: intact apart from the loss of the two diving boards which do not often survive; * Group value: situated quite near the remains of the 1824-6 Clifton Baths (Grade II), an 1935 lift and the other 1937 tidal pool. 

P1040713 copy

P1040716 copy

P1040717 copy

P1040718 copy

P1040719 copy

P1040720 copy

P1040836 copy

North Foreland Estate – Broadstairs

Where the lone lawn ranger, meets the top of the range Range Rover.

Yippee ki oh ki-yay!

Forever out to out Lutyens.

I think you’re probably out to lunch.

To walk the shoreline path through North Foreland Estate, is to walk an intentionally unintentional free market, mash-up of architectural history.

Hey ho let’s go!

To begin at the beginning, 1636 a lighthouse is erected – leaping forward somewhat:

During World War II a number of radar stations were set up by German forces in France and the Netherlands to detect allied aircraft flying across the English Channel and a chain of top secret radar jamming stations were set up by British scientists along the south east coast of Britain. An array of transmitters was set out around gallery of the lighthouse controlled by equipment in the lower lantern as part of this chain.

1280px-North_Foreland_Lighthouse_by_George_Jackson

The North Foreland lighthouse was last manned lighthouse in the UK, but was automated in a ceremony presided over by the Duke of Edinburgh in 1998.

It seems appropriate that the DoE should preside over the automation, however, I digress.

This is a gently rolling coast line, low chalk cliffs harbouring sandy coves and spies.

And the wealth of nations, £2,000,000 gets you this shiny hunk of real estate.

e5d99b95-661e-49d2-b89a-9db836b15c68-xl

A gated community, double negated through further gating, ornamental railings, well clipped hedges, picket fences, high grey stuccoed walls, and attendant dogs.

Big dogs, very big dogs, fortunately with even bigger walls.

P1040768 copy

As is often the case in such areas the residents are short of nothing – excepting residents.

There was but on lone lawnmower owning owner to nod to.

P1040755 copy

Last seen, receding towards his quasi sixties, semi-dormered detached, hat intact.

So accompany me now through the New England homes of the new England, admire the Mock Gothic, Super Krazed Moderne, pseudo Tudo-Jacobethan delights that await us.

P1040756 copy

P1040757 copy

P1040758 copy

P1040759 copy

P1040762 copy

P1040763 copy

P1040764 copy

P1040766 copy

P1040767 copy

P1040769 copy

P1040770 copy

P1040771 copy

P1040772 copy

Too rich for your undernourished pockets, have you considered a drawing of a house?

High concept, conceptual housing for the under-housed.

P1040780 copy

P1040774 copy

P1040775 copy

P1040777 copy

So farewell the North Shoreland I’ll leave you to get on with your high value, property based, rise and fall bollard lifestyle I, like Felix – kept on walking.

P1040783 copy