Linda’s Pantry – Manchester

Turn off London Road and into Ducie Street, it’s just around the corner from Piccadilly Station.

Enter a world of warehouses, homes and industry.

webmedia-1.php

webmedia-4.php

webmedia-1.php

webmedia-3.php

webmedia-2.php

Return some fifty years later and you’ll find a café on the corner.

Screen Shot 2018-07-09 at 19.55.53

Return last Saturday you’ll find that it’s gone.

P1270029

No more of this.

b872c05fb8251eb973cf30b3cee7e421

 

Top class scran at prices to suit all pockets.

EGP_MEN_LindasPantry_201017_007JPG

Linda and her crew have packed up the pans and scrammed.

Read all about it – Manchester Evening News

The face of the city changes, as one by one faces and places disappear, new build and mass tourism making ever new demands on space.

The rag trade is in tatters and the tatters are long gone.

It would seem that there is no place for the traditional café or its customers.

So thank you and goodnight, the last pie, chips and gravy has left the counter.

Shut the door and turn out the lights.

P1270025

P1270027

P1270028

P1270033

P1270034

P1270035

P1270038

P1270039

P1270042

P1270044

P1270048

P1270051

P1270052

 

Sale Pyramid Odeon Cinema

Cinema Treasures

Located in Sale, Cheshire, now part of Greater Manchester. Designed by the famous British cinema architectural firm, Drury & Gomersall, the Pyramid Theatre is a classic example of an Egyptian-style cinema in Britain and had a 1,940 seating capacity.

The frontage although not particularly Egyptian in overall design does have various Egyptian style mouldings and fluted pillars. Internally, the Egyptian theme was again largely mouldings and finishes like Graumans Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood. The theme was included in the specially designed Christie Organ, which was installed in the Blue Coat School in Oldham.

Following a request by the school to remove the organ in 2008, the organ was in storage for five years. The Christie has now been donated to the Lowe Side Trust, by the LTOT,  along with funding for refurbishment and installation, of both consoles, into Lowe House Catholic Church, St. Helens, Lancashire. As of the beginning of 2018 the the original pit console is now fully functioning in the Church. The Egyptian style stage console is now under refurbishment to full theatre specification. Website for this project will be available shortly.

Lancastrian Theatre Organ Trust

bccolcr

The Pyramid Theatre changed hands a couple of times between its opening on 24th February 1934 and 21st December 1942 when it was taken over by Oscar Deutsch’s Odeon Theatres Ltd. chain. It was re-named Odeon on 18th June 1945.

large-1

In 1981, the Rank Organisation closed 29 of its Odeon cinemas and the lease for the Odeon Sale was bought by the Tatton Cinemas group and it was re-named Tatton Cinema. Stage shows returned to the theatre, however the runing costs caused the lease to revert to Rank in 1984 and the building was closed.

Screen Shot 2018-06-28 at 07.51.12

odsastr

The cinema was purchased by Trafford Borough council for £200,000, but by 1987 the costs to the council were estimated at £1.5 million. A campaign was started to save it from demolition.

In 1988, it was advertised for sale by tender and by 1990 the cinema was converted into an American themed nightclub, known as JFK’s

The nightclub closed around 2001 and the auditorium was transformed into a franchised L.A. Fitness Centre, using a former front stalls exit as its entrance. The main entrance and foyers are currently unused. In 2013 it became a Sports Direct Fitness Club.

The Pyramid Theatre was designated a Grade II Listed building in November 1987.

It is currently closed and seemingly unused.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Screen Shot 2018-06-28 at 07.51.49

I often cycle passed and wonder about your past, and a possible future.

large

Our cinema heritage is and always had been under threat, listed and unloved desperately seeking the care and attention to survive into another other century. Subsequent repurposing has proved temporary and unsustainable, without the concerted efforts of local authority, charitable trust and enthusiastic amateurs, you will remain a silent pharaonic sentinel by the side of Washway Road.

Forever.

“Only the best is good enough for Sale”

 

P1260515

P1260517

 

P1260519

P1260520

P1260521

P1260522

 

P1260524

P1260525

P1260527

P1260529

P1260514

 

 

Taylor Street Gorton – The Pineapple

Screen Shot 2018-06-11 at 17.33.47

To begin at the beginning or thereabouts, Taylor Street was at the heart of Gorton to the east of Manchester city centre.

webmedia-1.php

webmedia-2.php

webmedia-3.php

webmedia-6.php

webmedia-7.php

webmedia-8.php

webmedia-9.php

webmedia-10.php

webmedia.php

A typical street of tightly packed brick terraces, dotted with shops, pubs, people and industry. I worked there as van lad for Mother’s Pride bread back in the 70s and saw those shops, pubs, people and industry slowly disappear.

Beyer Peacock whose immense shed dominated the northern end of the street, simply ceased to be, as steam gave way to diesel.

As full employment gave way to a date with the dole.

Adsega opening on nearby Cross Street heralded the arrival of the super fast, self-service supermarket, and sounded the death knell of the cosy corner cupboard.

398912_3820026268527_1203084936_n

The local pub was The Bessemer – its name forging an unbreakable link with the surrounding steel industry, that eventually broke.

webmedia-5.php

To the left of the pub is the Bishop Greer High School construction site  – the first of the new build that would later dominate the area, along with wide open spaces where shops, pubs, people and industry once were.

12932970_10154152981641600_8757469207112330278_n

webmedia.php copy

webmedia-1.php copy

When the school eventually shut its doors, it became an annex of Openshaw Technical College, and I found myself working there in the 80s at the East Manchester Centre, until its eventual closure.

It’s now sheltered accommodation for the lost and lonely:

Located in a quiet suburb of Manchester with excellent links to the city centre, Gorton Parks has an exceptional range of facilities spread out across five separate houses, each offering a different care option. Melland House offers dementia residential care, Abbey Hey provides nursing dementia care, Debdale is the house for intermediate nursing care and Sunny Brow offers general nursing care.

We sought solace in The Pineapple.

Screen Shot 2018-06-11 at 17.33.25

The streets were trimmed and slimmed, much of the past a mere ghostly presence, almost imprinted on the present.

A brave new world of brand new modern housing, with an Estate Pub to match.

The_Pineapple,_Gorton

A busy bustling boozer – lots of live and local action for the lively locals, latterly seeing out time as a house of House – a real bangin’ Bashment, bass-man bargain basement.

Until time is finally called – no more four to the floor, last one out shut the door.

1512347_516327525148853_492482006_n

Nothing lasts forever and a sign of the times is an upended pub sign, lying dormant in the dust.

The Chunky no longer a great big hunk o’funk.

10 Gorton pineapple pub

The big screen TV forever failing to deliver all the action, live or otherwise.

P1050836

p1050838.jpg

Latterly transformed into Dribble Drabble.

DSC_0074

And so the beat goes on as successive waves of success and recession, boom and bust free-market economics, wash over the nation and its long suffering folk.

Its enough to drive you to drink.

Long Lane Post Office – Heald Green

Screen Shot 2018-05-30 at 14.09.16

190 Wilmslow Rd, Heald Green, Cheadle SK8 3BH

The original Long Lane Post Office is still there but not here:

40249

However – I digress.

One fine day, some time ago there popped into my consciousness a Sixties retail mosaic in the Heald Green area – I tracked down its precise whereabouts online, in the modern manner.

Thinks – one fine day, just you wait and see I’ll pay a visit to the Heald Green area.

So today I did, it started off fine and finished up less so.

Jumped the 368 from Stockport Bus Station alighted at The Griffin.

Walked aways up the road and there it was, almost intact – it’s original name obliterated with lilac exterior emulsion – did it once read healds?

Why of course it did – the local dairy and retailers were the shop’s original owners.

il_570xN.1484313889_n91e

A few tesserae are missing otherwise the piece is as was – a wobbly jumble of text, shape and colour.

Self service – at your service.

P1250715

P1250711

P1250712

P1250713

P1250714

 

P1250717

P1250718

P1250719

P1250720

P1250721

P1250722

P1250723

P1250724

P1250725

 

Macclesfield Railway Station

Where the Victorians modelled their stations on cathedrals, temples and palaces.

Modern Man models his on shopping centre and office blocks.

Richards and MacKenzie – The Railway Station

Though it seems to me that Macclesfield Station, in its earlier and current states, refuses to dovetail neatly into either of these sloppy binary paradigms.

macclesfield_central_1900.s

The former – single storey buildings, fitting unostentatiously into the topographic and practical constraints of the site. A neat, tightly packed rhythm of brick arches with a compact and bijou porch welcoming the expectant traveller.

P1250546

The latter a functionalist block, fully utilitarian crossings with lift access columns, embodying a particularly industrial demeanour.

From the golden age of steam to the moribund years of diesel, Macclesfield sits comfortably somewhere, betwixt and between ugly duckling and fully fledged swan.

Nestled in the lea of the East Cheshire Highlands, offering practical everyday transport solutions to the beleaguered commuter.

No frills, no thrills.

macclesfield(harden4.1954)centrall_old4

c964acf720e0b759fda2f4788256c528

The London and North Western Railway opened the line between Manchester and Macclesfield on 19 June 1849 – Macclesfield Central was born. Later it would become a key station on the Stafford branch of the West Coast Main Line, remodelled in 1960 and rebranded as the much snappier Macclesfield Station.

Which it proudly announces topically and typographically to the world.

P1250547

Welcome to Macclesfield a town that is clearly going places, and so are you.

The station won the Best Kept Station in Cheshire Award for 2007, but was reported in summer 2011 to be distinctly shabby, with peeling paintwork.

And yet there is something in the constituent Platonic steel, glass and concrete forms that never ceases to amuse and amaze me, this is Brutalism on a human and provincial scale.

The raw concrete softened with three or four shades of grey, as a concession to the delicate suburban sensibilities of this once silk-fuelled town.

Take a trip with me – join the Cheshire train set.

P1250548

P1250549

P1250550

P1250551

P1250552

P1250553

P1250554

P1250555

P1250557

P1250558

P1250560

P1250564

P1250565

P1250566

 

 

Brucciani’s – Morecambe

Brucciani – 217 Marine Rd Central, Morecambe LA4 4BU217

Built on the eve of war in 1939, the local paper feared that Brucciani’s might not be good for the sedate Victorian image of Morecambe and that its presence could be positively harmful to young people. Originally a milk bar, Brucciani’s typifies the simple, geometric ‘high street deco’ styling popular at the time. The brown wood and chrome exterior has black lacquer base panels to the street, porthole lamps above the doors, ziggurat pattern doors, classic deco handles and original menus. The interior preserves extensive wall panelling, a slightly reworked counter, red Formica tables, red upholstered chairs, wall-to-wall etched glass of Venetian canal scenes, mirrors, deco clocks and even the original penny-in-the-slot cubicles in the cloakrooms.

Classic cafés

I’ve been coming here for over ten years now, alone or in company, come rain or shine and without fail, as sure as ice is nice, I have a banana spilt – or to be more precise a Banana Royal.

Screen Shot 2018-04-27 at 13.53.13

Jenny Steele 2015

This is a café with a café menu, café furniture, café staff and service.

It only ever wanted and wants to be a café, unchanged by the uncaring winds of vicissitude and fashion. To tread the turquoise and tan linoleum, ‘neath the period lighting fixtures and fittings, to be seated on the warm red leatherette, one elbow on the circular Formica table is to enter into into a pact with a perfect past.

It’s on the front you can’t miss it – overlooking the Sunset Bay.

DSC_0233 copy

DSC_0200 copy

DSC_0201 copy

DSC_0202 copy

DSC_0203 copy

P1210019 copy

P1210017 copy

P1210020 copy

DSC_0217 copy

cafe copy

caffe2 copy

DSC_0014 copy

DSC_0015 copy

DSC_0016 copy

DSC_0051 copy

DSC_0219 copy

DSC_0232 copy

P1210018 copy

P1210021 copy

P1210022 copy

P1210023 copy

P1210024 copy

caff copy

 

Shopping Precincts – UK

I was brought up with Sixties’ shopping precincts and centres, they are so very dear to my heart, I spent my teenage years here in AshtonStalybridge, and latterly in Stockport’s Merseyway.

I’ve visited Hanley, Preston, Salford, and Coventry in search of a certain something – that exciting sweeping swoop of concrete, brick, glass and steel. Underpasses with overarching designs and luxurious layouts of leisurely interlocking levels. Each one different in a different way yet essentially similar – embodying a sense of civic pride, a sense of the future realised.

1571 – The Royal Exchange, a trading market in the City of London, is officially opened by Elizabeth I. Above the open-air piazza where dealers buy and sell commodities, there is a two-storey shopping mall, with 100 different kiosks – making it Britain’s first shopping centre.

1964 – It was a monument to provincial pride in reinforced concrete and glass. When the Duke of Edinburgh opened the Birmingham Bull Ring in May 1964, it was the largest indoor shopping centre in Europe, with a total floor area of 23 acres. Inspired by American suburban malls, the Bull Ring promised coatless shopping in an air-conditioned, temperature-controlled hall maintained at late-spring level.

JS55897014

2017 – Many are now no more, or redeveloped beyond recognition. The integrity of the architecture, street furniture, public art, space and usage a thing of folk memory.

So come with me now on a whirlwind picture postcard tour of this Nation’s saving grace – it’s modernist shopping spaces.

aberdeen-e1522241288210.jpg

Aberdeen

barlaston

Barlaston

bedford-copy.jpg

Bedford

Bracknell copy

Bracknell

brentwood a

Brentwood

brighton

Brighton

burton

Burton on Trent

butts reading

Butts – Reading

chelmsford

Chelmsford

corby b

Corby

cov

coventry a

coventry

Coventry

cowplain

Cowplain

crawley

Crawley

crewe

Crewe

croydon

Croydon

cwmbran

Cwmbran

dudley

Dudley

elephant and castle

Elephant and Castle

great yarmouth copy

Great Yarmouth

hanley

Hanley

harlow

Harlow

hartlepool.jpg

Hartlepool

Hebburn

Hebburn

immingham

Immingham

irvine

Irvine

leamore

Leamore

letch arena_parade_mid

Letchworth

leyland.jpg

Leyland

liverpool

Liverpool

mexborough

Mexborough

MK b

MK

MKa

Milton Keynes

nantwich

Nantwich

norris green

Norris Green

plymouth

Plymouth

runcorn

Runcorn

sleaford.jpg

Sleaford

southampton

Southampton

stockport b

Stockport

swanley

Swanley

telford

Telford

wakefield

Wakefield

walton on thames

Walton on Thames

westway frome

Westway – Frome

w mander centre wolv

Wolverhampton

s-l1600-31.jpg

Worksop