Type Travel – Manchester

This is a journey through time and space by bicycle, around the rugged, ragged streets of East Manchester.

Undertaken on Sunday September 2nd 2018.

This is type travel – the search for words and their meanings in an ever changing world.

 

map

Hyde Road

P1280955

P1280956

The Star Inn – former Wilsons pub

Devonshire Street North

P1280961

Former Ardwick Cemetery

P1280962

Great Universal Stores former mail order giant

Palmerston Street

P1280979

The River Inn abandoned pub

Every Street

P1290001

All Souls Church – listed yet unloved

Pollard Street East

P1290008.jpg

Screen Shot 2018-09-04 at 08.37.57

The Bank Of England abandoned pub

P1290020

Ancoats Works former engineering company

Cambrian Street

P1290024.jpg

The Lunchbox Café Holt Town

Upper Helena Street

P1290028

The last remnants of industrial activity

Bradford Road

P1290046

Brunswick Mill

P1290048

The little that remains of Raffles Mill

P1290052

Old Mill Street

P1290054

Ancoats Dispensary loved listed and still awaiting resuscitation

P1290056.jpg

New life New Islington

Redhill Street

P1290057

Former industrial powerhouse currently contemporary living space

Henry Street

P1290063

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth passed by in 1942

Jersey Street

P1290064

Former School the stone plaque applied to a newer building

Gun Street

P1290065

The last of the few Blossom Motors

Addington Street

P1290067

P1290069

Former fruit merchants – refurbished and home to the SLG creative agency

Marshall Street and Goulden Street area

P1290070

P1290071

P1290073

P1290081

P1290086

P1290087

The last remnants of the rag trade

Sudell Street

P1290089

P1290090

All that’s left of Alexandra Place

P1290092

Entrance to the former Goods Yard

Back St Georges Road

P1290096

Sharp Street

P1290099

P1290100

Simpson Street

P1290101

Where once the CWS loomed large

Charter Street

P1290102

P1290107

Ragged but right

Aspin Lane

P1290109

P1290117

Angel Meadow 

Corporation Street

P1290118

 

Church of St Mark – Chadderton

Life is full of little surprises, to turn from Middleton Road into Milne Street in downtown Chadderton and discover a triangular, blue-grey brick tower soaring into the September sky.

So solid geometries pierced by rectangular, triangular and angular gridded windows, deservedly Grade II Listed in 1998, made all the more extraordinary by its seemingly ordinary surroundings.

The interior mixes tradition with modernity, reusing pews and fragments of stained glass. Restrained natural lighting, complemented by slatted wooden, almost oriental boxed light shades. The furniture, fixtures and fittings bringing together a coherent decorative order.

The whole an uplifting and embracing space, punctuated by the curved y-shaped wooden supports, rising to the timber framed roof structure.

It was a pleasure to meet the current incumbent Father Stephen and a privilege to spend some time exploring this altogether delightful and impressive church.

Thank you.

I suggest that you do the same.

Contact details and location.

G.G. Pace 1960-63 – Blue engineering brick; graduated slate to pitched roofs – low pitched to church and entrance and steeply pitched to tower. Concrete dressings around windows. Five sided aisled space, three walls being orthoganal and the liturgical north side being canted outwards to provide room for the choir. Entrance with narthex to west and west also is a small rectangular chapel. Corner site, the corner itself dominated by a low rectangular brick tower with a high gabled roof. Four bay nave, the bays separated by buttresses and with rectangular windows set in varying groups high in the wall. West wall of nave is visible, and secondary glazing has been sensitively installed over the west window between the western buttresses. Thick exposed board-marked concrete beam at eaves. On return elevation, tower is flush with small chapel, with irregular groups of rectangular windows to both. Rectangular leaded lights. Recessed entrance with two doors of timber and leaded-glazing in vertical strips. Liturgical north and south faces of the tower each has a stack of 14 small pointed louvres. Jutting gutter spouts in exposed board-marked concrete.

Internally the bays are divided by three pairs of varnished laminated timber `y’ shaped supports and trusses, supporting timber trussed purlins (with prominent bolts) and timber rafters. Walls are white-painted brick with exposed board-marked concrete bands, which act as bonding strips between brick piers and as lintels for windows. Original altar of limed timber with four pairs of legs, is in original position, set forward from the east wall. Sanctuary raised by two steps. Limed timber pulpit, also chunky and so is altar rail with thick black metal supports and thick limed timber handrail. Priest’s chair to match, against east wall. Black metal crucifix also in characteristic Pace manner. Stone sedilia built into the north and south walls of the sanctuary. East window with stained glass which comprises broken and reset fragments of nineteenth-century glass. Font sited in central aisle towards the west end; this is of tooled cream stone, the bowl comprising a monolithic cylinder, flanked by a smaller cylinder which rises higher and has a prominent spout. Elaborate font cover in roughly textured cast aluminium, rising to flame-like pinnacles. Reused nineteenth-century benches, painted semi-matt black. Narthex and west chapel with limed timber doors, which have decorative nail-heads in rows. West chapel has open truss timber roof, painted white. Sanctuary light and cross are characteristic of Pace’s style.

A fine example of Pace’s idiosyncratic manner, this church shows the influence of the Liturgical Movement, especially in the forward placement of the altar.

British Listed Buildings

A fine companion to Pace’s William Temple Church in Wythenshawe.

P1290252

P1290256

 

P1290258

P1290260

 

P1290266

P1290267

P1290270

P1290275

P1290277

P1290280

P1290281

P1290283

P1290284

P1290286

P1290287

P1290288

P1290289

P1290290

P1290294

P1290299

P1290306

P1290309

P1290311

P1290314

Lady Chapel

P1290321

P1290323

P1290326

P1290329

 

Long Lane Post Office – Heald Green

Screen Shot 2018-05-30 at 14.09.16

190 Wilmslow Rd, Heald Green, Cheadle SK8 3BH

The original Long Lane Post Office is still there but not here:

40249

However – I digress.

One fine day, some time ago there popped into my consciousness a Sixties retail mosaic in the Heald Green area – I tracked down its precise whereabouts online, in the modern manner.

Thinks – one fine day, just you wait and see I’ll pay a visit to the Heald Green area.

So today I did, it started off fine and finished up less so.

Jumped the 368 from Stockport Bus Station alighted at The Griffin.

Walked aways up the road and there it was, almost intact – it’s original name obliterated with lilac exterior emulsion – did it once read healds?

Why of course it did – the local dairy and retailers were the shop’s original owners.

il_570xN.1484313889_n91e

A few tesserae are missing otherwise the piece is as was – a wobbly jumble of text, shape and colour.

Self service – at your service.

P1250715

P1250711

P1250712

P1250713

P1250714

 

P1250717

P1250718

P1250719

P1250720

P1250721

P1250722

P1250723

P1250724

P1250725

 

Walton’s – Ashton Under Lyne

William Walton’s and Sons – 152 Stamford Street, Ashton-under-Lyne, OL6 6AD

Stamford-Street-Ashton-under-Lyne

Founded in 1832 – when Stamford Street looked a lot like this.

Much has changed during the ensuing years, Walton’s it seems has not.

On Monday 24th October 2011 I had the privilege of meeting current owners Margaret and Dave, spending time chatting and taking photographs.

Thank you.

They tell their own tale – take a look.

DSC_0013

DSC_0015

DSC_0018

DSC_0020

DSC_0023

DSC_0026

DSC_0027

DSC_0028

DSC_0029

DSC_0035

DSC_0036

DSC_0037

DSC_0038

DSC_0039

DSC_0041

DSC_0042

DSC_0043

DSC_0045

DSC_0047

DSC_0049

DSC_0050

DSC_0051

DSC_0052

DSC_0053

DSC_0055

DSC_0056

DSC_0058

DSC_0060

DSC_0067

DSC_0069

DSC_0072

DSC_0076

DSC_0077

DSC_0078

DSC_0079

DSC_0082

DSC_0087

DSC_0088

DSC_0089

DSC_0090

DSC_0092

DSC_0093

DSC_0095

DSC_0096

DSC_0097

DSC_0098

DSC_0099

DSC_0101

DSC_0103

DSC_0104

DSC_0105

DSC_0107

DSC_0108

DSC_0113

DSC_0114

DSC_0115

 

 

Motorway Footbridge – Stockport

A Moebius Band of motorway formerly known as the M63 wraps and warps itself around the city, ever so conveniently linking the traffic of Greater Manchester with itself.

2000px-UK-Motorway-M63.svg

Ever so conveniently it passes through Stockport – only moments from my home.

M63

Screen Shot 2018-05-04 at 17.03.27

Before the white man came.

11993

11996

The view from Princes Street along Hatton Street – towards Heaton Norris Rec. 

19617

1945

50450

1960

A boon to the modern day motorist, though happily the modern day pedestrian is also catered for in the form of the Hatton Street Footbridge – linking Great Egerton Street below, with Heaton Norris Recreation ground above.

t-s-parkinson-81.jpg

88

821-e1525450826497.jpg

Images TS Parkinson –  Stockport Image Archive

For the past two years the footbridge has been inconveniently closed, during the development of the Redrock Leisure Facility, built on the site of the former car park, in the foreground of the image above. Thus prohibiting the passage from the Post Modern world of the big brash entertainment box, to the leafy cobbled street beyond.

The Hatton Street footbridge has two spans of in-situ u-section deck, is at ground level on the north side, but is reached by steps or ramp from Great Egerton Street on the south.

William B Ball

I’m ever so pleased that access has been reinstated, from me it is both fully functional yet imbued with an elegant concrete sculptural grace, worthy of Niemeyer or Lasdun.

So take a walk on the slightly higher side, either way you win.

P1240904

P1240906

P1240908

P1240909

P1240910

P1240912

P1240913

P1240919

P1240920

P1240922

P1240924

P1240925

P1240926

P1240927

P1240928

P1240929

P1240930

P1240931

P1240932

P1240933

P1240934

P1240935

P1240936

P1240938

P1240939

P1240942

P1240943

P1240948

P1240952

 

 

Bus Station – Stockport

From the early part of the Twentieth Century trams and then buses stopped and started in Mersey Square, affording limited succour, space or shelter for the weary traveller.

22942

View from the Fire Station Tower.

10891

View from the Plaza Steps.

The land where the bus station currently stands was then owned and used by North Western Buses – a rather large and uncultivated plot.

pd hancock 78

Work began in April 1979 on a brand new bus station, the first stage finally opening on March 2nd 1982.

14406

Slowly emerging from the rough ground – a series of glass and steel boxes worthy of that master of minimalism Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, a Neue Nationalgalerie in miniature.

79

1979 copy

81

Photographs from Stockport Image Archive

It has stood and withstood the winds of change and perfidious public transport policy, the privatisation of the service, snatched greedily from local authority control.

Passengers have met and parted, whilst buses of every hue and stripe have departed from these draughty boxes.

Screen Shot 2018-04-09 at 17.13.54

Photograph from Victory Guy

There are now plans for imminent demolition and rebuilding – shaping a transport hub fit for the Twenty First Century – Space Age forms for a brave new world.

A new £42m transport interchange in Stockport town centre has taken a step forward after the local council agreed key measures to back the project.

Screen-Shot-2017-09-19-at-07.02.03

Untitled-1

April 9th 2017 here is my photographic record of the Bus Station, I’ve been, gone and come back again countless times through the years.

P1240953 copy

P1240954 copy

P1240456

P1240429

P1240431

P1240441

P1240445

P1240446

P1240447

P1240457

P1250012

P1250013

P1240459

P1240460

P1240462

P1240470

P1240472

P1240473

P1240474

P1240475

P1240476

P1240478

P1240479

P1240484

P1240485

P1240487

P1240488

P1240490

P1240507

P1240512

P1240514

P1240515

 

 

Allied Ironfounders – Audenshaw

As I walked out one morning, in search of an industrial access cover or two or more, I found more, much more, dug deeper, unearthed a can of worms, a murky past cast in cast iron.

This is the cover closest to my home on Didsbury Road Stockport, manufactured by Glynwed of Corporation Road Audenshaw, the closest foundry to my former school.

screen-shot-2016-09-16-at-17-55-59

Glynwed formerly Allied Ironfounders, the manufacturer of gas appliances, the humble Rayburn and the infamous stuff of sagas the Aga.

screen-shot-2016-09-16-at-18-34-01

the-story-behind-a-symbol-alied-ironfounders-front-cover-c-1950_600px

And the Meridian Grate – great! The foundry was also known as the Planet Works, the adjoining rough ground Planet Fields, where on wet winter days we would form a mud spattered procession of ragged schoolboys engaged in the joys of cross country running, over a factory’s spoil tip.

t07526

We never got to see the firm’s Mayfair showrooms, we never got to pass go – I guess it was just too far to run, cross country or otherwise.

21467-1-434-434-ffffff

21468-1-434-434-ffffff

The sleek Modernist lines of the Allied Ironfounders’ showpiece contrasts with the conditions of the work force manufacturing the grates and Agas.

t21844

t21854

t07525

So some fifty years and several miles separates me from my schooldays and my local gas inspection cover. Guess I’l just gas up the Thames Trader and head for the hills folks.

Yippie-aye-ay, yippie-aye-oh, ghost riders in the sky.

And underground.